Posts Tagged ‘Producers’

Beatmaker-Producer Verse All has finally released :Instrumology 2: iTwo, available on iTunes today. :Instrumology 2: iTwo is an 18 track instrumental LP and the follow up to Verse All’s  first full-length album entitled :Instrumology: The Science Of Beat Making. Each track has it’s own unique vibe, full of soulful samples, and gives you that good ol’ Boom Bap street feeling at times. If you do not have an iTunes account, not a problem! You can purchase iTwo from Amazon.com, Rhapsody.com, Emusic.com, and many more digital retail stores where available (Coming soon to Bandcamp.com). Below is a link to iTunes music store, where you can preview and purchase the full album or individual songs. Show your support to a veteran beat maker. Enjoy!


:Instrumology2: iTwo by Verse All

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WE ARE BACK: With another installment of producer’s spotlight. Today’s Producer’s Spotlight Shine’s on J57! I first met J57 at the famous Fat Beat Records Store, once located at west 4th street, New York, NY. Any  time I’d visit Fat Beats, I’d make sure to catch J57 for a little hip-hop talk plus to find out what new albums dropped.  J57’s crew BBAS also known as the Brown Bag All Stars also consist of Soul Khan, KonCept, and Audible Doctor. Without further due, I bring to you, J57! 

INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?

J57: I’m J57. I’m an emcee & producer from a group called Brown Bag AllStars. I was born and raised in Long Island, NY and have lived in Brooklyn for the past 6 1/2 years. I was lucky enough to work at the legendary record store, Fat Beats for 6 years before it closed in late 2010 and I’ve been a part of DJ Eclipse’s show ”Rap Is Outta Control” on SIRIUS/XM (Channel 44 – Hip Hop Nation – Every Sunday night 10pm EST) for the past 3 years.

INST: Who have you worked with & how long have been beat making or producing?

J57: My credits so far consist of Brown Bag AllStars(groupwise & solo), Homeboy Sandman, Sene, Action Bronson, Meyhem Lauren, AG da Coroner, Nitty Scott MC, Rasheed Chappell, Denitia Odigie, Charlie Smarts, Von Pea of Tanya Morgan, Jefferson Price, Tenacity, F.Virtue, Booda French, Sabac Red of Non Phixion, ILL Bill (Not released yet), Reks & Termanology (Not released yet), Nutso, Blame One, Exile (Not released yet) and like a million other incredible artists – too many to list. Very blessed to work with everyone I’ve worked with/work with on a regular basis.

I’ve been making beats since December 2002, so that’s 10 years of blood, sweat and tears.

INST: What equipment and or software are you using?
J57: I use Propellorhead Reason 3.0, a 32 key midi-controller keyboard, the Akai MPD 32 and work closely with a bunch of talented musicians like PJ Katz, Akie Bermiss, Recess, Mike13, and more.

INST: What made you want to create beats?
J57: I started out being the main beatboxer in ciphers back in high school and my good friend/very talented emcee & producer; Hi-Q, was like, ”You really need to start making beats. I have a feeling you’re going to be dope.” So, he and our good friend, producer, EQ then taught me how to make beats on Reason and the rest is history.

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

J57: I like both equally. It just really depends on my mood. If I’m in the mood to sample records, then nothing in the world can stop me from digging through the endless supply of records that I’ve been saving for the past ten years. But, if I’m in the mood to make huge sounding sample-free stuff, then I bring in my ‘go to’ musicians and orchestrate some big, big production. That’s NOT saying you can’t make big sounding beats with samples, ofcourse. I’m just talking about the vibe/style.

INST: Who influenced your style?

J57: My main influences are: DJ Premier, RZA, Marco Polo, DJ Khalil, Exile, Jake One, S1, Alex da Kid, J Dilla, Madlib, Dr. Dre and Moby.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

J57: Never ever. Not even when I’m old and hard of hearing or crippled and can’t pound on the MPD – I’ll pay someone to do that part for me and I’ll just mutter the ideas of what’s going on in my head haha. As long as I have my hearing and can verbalize or write down what I’m hearing in my head, I’ll be good.

INST: Is there a difference between being a producer and being a beat maker?

J57: Absolutely. A song to a producer is always a work in progress, where they’re constantly adding to the track. Where as a beat maker, makes the beat, sends it to the artist and let’s the rapper or singer have their way with the beat. A producer just really oversee’s the song and constantly builds the track around the vocalist, sometimes brings in live instruments to spice the track up, etc.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

J57: Yes; put in your 10,000 of work. Once you hit 10,000 hours you can do anything you want. Once you’ve worked on beats for exactly 10,000, you’ll be an unstoppable force that the world will embrace. Or, you could just be dope from the start like my man DeeJay Element. He’s been DJ’ing for 10+ years and was immediately incredible at making beats because of his knowledge from DJ’ing, mixed with raw talent. But the other 99% of people, like myself, this stuff takes a lot of time, so work hard and never ever give up.

INST: Where can we hear your work?

J57: The best places to check my stuff out would be;

J57music.com and BrownBagAllStars.com

A ton of good, free music on both sites – check it out!

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Westcoast Producer Dj Battlecat in the lab!

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Check out this clip of Battlecat doing his thing in the studio!

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It was the year 2004 when I was first introduced to Fonk-C. We were both at a show in Alexandria Va. to perform that evening along with a host of other artist. I remember the energy coming from Fonk and his crew as they bounced around the stage to a funk based sound track of absolute rhythm.
A year later, I would purchase a cd from then, Culture Cypha group member Enoch 7th Prophet, who had collaborated with Fonk-C for his solo EP entitled “Tone Scientizt”. Fonk’s prouction gives you a bit of an abstract vibe, mixed with a little boom bap, and a blend of southern crunkness to make it all complete. Beatmakers, Producers, and Music Lovers, meet Fonk-C!

INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?

El-Ra: El-Ra Is Fonk-C from Augusta Georgia, living In Hollywood California.

INST: Who are some of the artist you’ve worked with and how long have been producing?

El-Ra: I’ve worked with Eastern Standard, Clutch Brady, B-Ez, K-Dubya, Enoch 7th Prophet, Freedom Black, Jappa, Ed O.G. , JoeNice , Sun-God, Goddess Lyric From Bad Girls Club, F.Durty, SpaceJamShawty, to name a few:
Making Beats / Producing Since 1995 Professionally.

I’ve Recorded at Patchwerk Studio (ATL), Grand Hustle Studio (ATL), Dobbler Studio (ATL), I Zoom Studio (Augusta/Atlanta).

INST: Can you tell us what type of equipment and software you are using?

El-Ra: Hardware— MPC200XL, MOTIF ES7 WORKSTATION, TRITON RACK, AKAI S2000, OLD RECORDS, 1200’s, WAV.FILES, ECT.
Software: ROLAND VS-2400CD Maxed Out, ROLAND VS-8 TRACK, REASON

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INST: How did you first get started creating beats?

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El-Ra: I started making beats because I’m a DJ first. After Dj’ing for a while and learning how to count bars and matching BPM’s, that made me want to become a Producer!

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

El-Ra: I use samples and I also play live.

INST: Who influenced your style?

El-Ra: DJ Premier, Q-Tip, DJ Magic Mike, 2LiveCrew, Rza, Erick Sermon, DJ Quik, Dr.Dre, James Brown, Russ Rock, and Russell Turner.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

El-Ra: I retired last year. You have to balance life and work or else you won’t LOVE your craft!
Although I’m currently making HEAT!!!!

INST: Do you feel that there is a difference when being called a producer or being called a beat maker?

El-Ra: A Producer Creates WHOLE ALBUMS. A Beatmaker Just Makes BEATS.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

El-Ra: Whatever Your Passion Is Follow YOUR HEART!!!!! Stay true to yourself And You Will Progress Long Term!!!! Surround Yourself With PEOPLE That Think Like You And Want The same things in life no matter what COLOR they are!!!!

INST: Where can we hear your work?

El-Ra: Google (El-Ra Is Fonk-C) / SoundClound ( El-Ra Is Fonk-C)

Contact: FonkCrazy@gmail.com

LOVE IS THE BALANCE!!!

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WE, as beatmakers and producers tend to purchase equipment that suits our need for a certain quality of sound and style. Some of us run out and by the latest new peice of equipment no matter how expensive it may be. Then you have the few that hold on to their relic pieces of equipment because they have become accustom to using it. However, many beatmakers and producers lack the care of keeping their equipment safe from accidental spills, dust, smoke, ashes, etc. Most beatmakers, producers, and music engineers smoke and drink inside of their music studios plus allow recording artist to do the same. I’ve always heard that if you smoke around your music equipment or any type of electronic devices such as comupters, cell phones, gaming consoles, etc. it will get damaged earlier than its original life span. Dusty and damp areas are also no good for your equipment so if your setup is in an unkept basement, attic, shed, or a room that doesn’t get much air circulating through it, then chances are your equipment will suffer in the long run.

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Here are some tips that I’ve put together on how to care for your equipment.

Tip 1: Always cover your equipment up after using it.
Doing this will help protect it from from any lingering dust particles that can build up on top or inside of your equipment

Tip 2: Turn off your equipment after you’re done with usage.
Give your machine time to rest. Keeping your equipment on for a long period of time can cause over heating and eventually blowout. Avoid leaving your equipment running all night while you’re sleeping. Not a good move!

Tip 3: Invest in a feather duster and cadenced air.
No matter how well kept your work station might be, you can’t avoid dust. Wipe down your equipment with a dry cloth or feather duster. Use canned air on equipment that has space in between that can hold dust. This helps to keep the dust to a minimum.

Tip 4: NO EATING, DRINKING, OR SMOKING IN THE STUDIO! This goes for every and anybody including yourself that smokes cigarettes etc. We’ve all heard the horror stories of how “so and so” was recording a hit record, got over excited and in his excitement, he knocks over a drink that spilled onto his equipment causing it to short out. My advice to you is to create an area where your clients can eat and be comfortable while you’re working. Smoking should “STRICTLY” be kept outside.

Tip 5: Avoid setting up your equipment in areas that are liable to get water danage.
Rain storms cause flooding to basement areas and leaks to attics due to damaged roof tops so find an area that will be lease damaging to your equipment or invest in some remodeling of your basements and attics and safe proof those areas.

Final Tip: Get insurance for your equipment.
This is one of the best things that you can do for your equipment especially if you are a self made business.

Last bit of advice, Set up some rules for your music studio and stick to them. If you take care of your equipment, your equipment will take care of you

What are your thoughts on this topic? Do you have any tips that you’d like to share? Let’s discuss it in the comments section of my blog.

Peace and BoomTap!

20130212-192953.jpg Producer/Recording Artist Alchemist Making A Beat!

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Lester “EazyBeatz” Angeles is a producer/ beatmaker from Hong Kong who I met online in a producers group on Facebook. After a few conversations with EazyBeats, I gave his beats a listen. I was impressed instantly with his style and production. Since EazyBeatz lives on the other side of the world, I had to email him the questions for this interview.

INST: Let the world know who you are?

EB: Eazy Also Known as EazyBeatz (Asian HipHop Producer) Founder of Hongkong’s Filipino Rap Group “Pinoy Wit Attitude”

INST: Who have you worked with & how long have you been beat making or producing?

EB: To be Honest, I started tryin’ out (making beats) was around 2004/2005.
But when one of my friends showed me (SOUNDCLICK.COM) where you can find downloadable hiphop beats, I was like F*ck it!!!
I’ll just concentrate on writing and start to focus on my “Rap Career”. Then years later, after I found out how important original beats are, because I wanted to do an independent album, I started researching again on how to make a proper hiphop beat. Then I started buying these cheap DRUM PADS, messin’ around with different types of sounds.

Throughout my whole entire years in the Music HipHop Scene, I have worked with Some of the Finest Underground Talents. It’s gon’ Be Pretty Long if I name them out 1 by 1 haha. And; I’m currently not in good terms with some of them haha. Ya’ll Know What’ HipHop is. RITE?!?!?

I’m Currently working with some Top Knotch Artist.

Internationally, I’m working with some underground rappers around New York, Los Angeles, Canada, New Zealand, Florida, Japan, and of course my city “HONGKONG” and Many More….

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INST: What equipment and or software are you using?
EB: Alesis Q49, Studio Projects C1, Akai Mini-MIDI Keyboard, Akai MPD 18 , FL Studio 10 , Abelton 8 LIVE, Alesis MultiMixer 4USB, Korg, NanoPad 2

INST: What made you want to create beats?
EB: Its All about the MONEY (haha), Naaaahh just kidding. I’m a son of a professional musician in Hong Kong, so music has been around me since I was a kid. Growing up I heard different types of music from rock, jazz, pop, and hip-hop. Looking at the music scene rite now, it’s really hard to hook up with some producers around that sell very cheap beats. So I decided to make my hobby into a small business.

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

EB: Well of course I prefer Playing Live Instruments Than Sampling. Hmmm.. it depends though because I use Both of them. depends on what type of music quality you’re bringin’ out.

INST: Who influenced your style?

EB: Swizz Beatz, Dr. Dre, Just Blaze, Jahlil Beatz, The Runners, AraabMuzik, Lex Luger, 808 Mafia, Dj Primiere, Bo1da, Cardiak, The Bizzness, HitBoy, MikeWill, Mannie Fresh, Cool & Dre, Young Chop, !LLM!ND, and Lowkey the Boy Wonder.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

EB: Nope!

INST: Do you feel that there is a difference between being a producer and being a beat maker?

EB: Nope! A BeatMaker Does Sampling and a Producer Plays Live Instruments. But in the END, they still make music. “AINT NO DIFFERENCE”.

INST: Do you have any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share with aspiring Producers and Beatmakers?

EB: All I can say is that when you’re creating music, Put it into your Heart. Trust Your Ears and Forget the Blings. Always be creative about makin New Crazy Sounds. Never Stop learning new stuff. Always watch beatmaking tutorials on youtube and do some research. Always remember that you’re never gonna be called one of the best producers if no one has ever rapped on your BEATS!!!

INST: Where can we hear your work?
EB: Here’s My Own Website: http://lestereazyangeles.wix.com/eazybeatz
Follow Me @ www.soundcloud.com/lester-angeles, www.youtube.com/lesterangele , Add Me on Facebook : Lester Eazybeatz Angeles, http://soundcloud.com/lester-angeles/brand-new-sound-eazybeatz

Checkout Eazy’s Production for your self and leave your feedback.