Posts Tagged ‘Pete Rock’

  
Pri The Honeydark is a Producer, Lyricist from Queens NY.  I’ve first discovered Pri some years back when myspace was the premier social networking website for artist, promoters, and making new friends and fanbase. Always humble, Pri would respond to my messages whenever I contacted her. Her style is Dark at times and her voice is lyrically dope when she’s rapping. Pri’s subject matter is always meaningful and complimentary to her production. I was excited to hear that Pri accepted this interview with me, as I am a fan of her music. If you were not familiar with Pri The Honeydark before this interview, now is the time for you to get familiar. So without anymore delay, I bring you Pri The Honeydark, Our Producer Spotlight of the week.
INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?
Pri: My name is Pri the Honeydark  (Pri is pronounced Pree) and I am from Queens, NY.   I am an M.C. and  music producer.  I am the Vibe magazine, Blaze magazine and Everlast Boxing Corp M.C. Battle Champion and I am also the 1st runner up competitor in both the Istandard Producers and MTP beat battle competitions.  I am 1/5 of the all female hip hop collective, The Anomolies and I am the founder of The Female Producers Association, which is a networking organization for creative women worldwide.  Outside of music I wear many hats, including interior designer, photographer, carpenter, artist (muralist), cook and MOTHER!  🙂  I am a creative flower, with a hard edge.  🙂
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INST: Who have you worked with & how long have been beat making or producing?

Pri: I started learning how to produce back in early 2000.  My current production focus is on film and television, which include licensing placements with MTV & Viacom.

How did you get started beatmaking-producing?

My son’s father, Afrobluu, was a DJ and producer (We started as a hip hop group and well…..you know…lol…a child was born).  We had a home filled with crates and equipment.  One day I asked him to teach me how to DJ (I’m not a DJ now, so obviously that didn’t work…lol), then he purchased a Tascam Porta One and that became the very first piece of equipment I learned to use.  Back then you had to double up on tracks in that machine like a motha’ to create a song!  However, I stuck it out and then moved on to chopping samples in the ASR and EPS keyboards with a Protools set-up.  By that time I had found my own style, which tends to be very dark…hence the name “Pri the Honeydark”, and it was on from there!

Of all of the artist that you’ve worked with, do you have a favorite artist that you work well with?

I like working with my crew The Anomolies, which includes Invincible, Helixx C, Big Tara and DJ Kuttin’ Kandi.  We are an all female Hip Hop collective.  Each individual has a unique style that challenges me to work in various genres.

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INST: What equipment and or software are you using?

Pri: After the ASR and EPS, I moved on to Propellerhead Reason.  I found out about it by accident after bumping into someone who used it while I was shopping for new equipment at Rogues Music Store in NYC.  At that time the Reason software was kind of low key. I had never heard of it, but once I used it for the first time, I knew I found what I had been seeking to go further and I have been using it ever since.  My keyboard trigger is an M-Audio 61 Key.  I also have Logic, but rarely use it.  I tried the  drum machine set up, but I just feel more comfortable playing keys.  I  also use loaded midi keys to play keyboard drums, which I use a lot to  make certain tracks sound more live.  I hope ONE day, I will have a  large enough space to store, learn and play on a real drum set….sigh.

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?
Pri: I love both sampling and live instruments. I like to play out sounds.   I generally play a lot of my sounds on my keyboard, but I also love to chop up samples and use loops as well.  Both mediums work, as long as the music is good to me.
Who influenced your style?
Afrobluu taught me, so he is the first influence.  The next individuals that influenced me the most were from our past.  A few of those influences would be Jimi Hendrix (I would have been a Hendrix groupie in my past life), Etta James, Billie Holiday, Janis Joplin and Bob Marley.  Those are some of the individuals I listen to mostly for an inspirational story within my music.  Nina Simone as well.  As far as hip hop is concerned, I have been inspired by producers such as, Dr Dre, DJ Premier, J Dilla, Rick Rubin, Diamond D, Da Beatminerz Just Blaze, Large Professor, Buckwild, Prince Paul, RZA, Pete Rock, Easy Mo bee, Denaun Porter, Freddie Foxxx, Alchemist etc…..etc…..the list goes on and on.  My style is Hard and Dark (sounds like a really interesting movie…lol).  I am mostly influenced by people who create that dark emotion within their tracks, but aren’t limited to them.
INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?
Pri: NOPE…fingers from the grave….lol
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INST: Do you feel that there a difference between being a producer and being a beat maker?
Pri: Yes there is .  A beat maker does just that, makes beats.  A producer deals with the entire span of the song from concept to completion.  The producer not only creates the beat, he/she must also marry the right artist to the track, be able to coach the artist to get the best out of him/her, sometimes write songs and/or sheet music, hire outside musicians and coach them if need be, pay for studio sessions, make sure the track is properly mixed down and mastered and usually the producer also has his/her hand in the contractual business and marketing of the project as well.  A beatmaker can chill in a room and make a beat, but a producer will take that same beat and turn it into a “song”.
INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?
Pri: Just do what you feel sounds right, but keep it crisp. Take a few music classes if needed to learn more about music theory.  Also, remember,  what you use is not important, but how you use it is, so don’t spend your entire paycheck on equipment, because your favorite producer uses it.  Save that money for business cards, a web site and marketing yourself.    Lastly…KNOW YOUR BUSINESS & BRAND!  This industry is 10% music 90% business and if you do not know your business, you will get nowhere!
INST: Where can we hear your work?
Pri: All of my connects are:




Producer/ Recording 9th Wonder Schooling You!

Producer/ Recording 9th Wonder Schooling You!

Checkout this clip of 9th Wonder dropping gems about the art of sampling.

Westcoast Producer Dj Battlecat in the lab!

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Check out this clip of Battlecat doing his thing in the studio!

Beatmaker-Producer Spooks McGhie

Beatmaker-Producer Spooks McGhie

Spooks McGhie is a beatmaker-Producer from New Jersey. Spooks caught my attention one day while I was listening to random music on facebook and thought to myself that I’d like to interview this beatmaker. I then sent Spooks a message to his inbox about being the first featured beatmaker for my newly launched instrumology.com website. Spooks responded by saying thank you but felt that he wasn’t ready for that title of being the first to be featured so he fell back until he felt that the time was right. We kept in touch via facebook and soundcloud and during this time, I’ve watched Spooks and his production grow and ganer a huge following. His persona is like everybodies favorite party starter and his tracks are very creative. Some tracks are collaborated with his wife making this a perfect combination. Beatmakers-Producers, and Music Lovers, Meet Spooks McGhie!

INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?

SPM: Hey hey young world. I am known as Spooks McGhie Coming at you from the Tri-State area, Brick City New Jersey AKA New York’s illegitimate brother.

INST: Who have you worked with & how long have been beat making or producing?

SPM: Wow. I have been composing for a long time. Always had a knack for sound, didn’t get on any equipment until I was about fifteen, so I guess it’s safe to say 11 years and counting. As far as people I have worked with, I have had some ridiculous setbacks. So I am not at the level I anticipated I would be musically by the time I was 25. But I can rattle off a couple names you may or may not recognize: ChanzizR and BlackScientist of Wi?Not Entertainment, Webbafied, Wino Willy, Badweather, D’Angelo Mack, Wil-EZ, Nzero NZ of Air Haze, Hi-Que, FranksWear, Wheredough?, Collin Moody, Dompollitt Aka Dolla Sign Dott, Gary Adams, Shannon Gillespy, Corr Kendricks, Jamaal Brooks, Droptop Harv, James Gibbs III, Black Astro, Oski of Iron Hogs, Keen Arthur, Anonimuz – you guys don’t know who the hell I’m talking about, do you? That’s okay. You will know ALL of those names soon. I only fox with the best. (HA).

INST: What equipment and or software are you using?

Spooks taking his baby for a stroll!SPM: I use a mixture of hardware and software.  I am forced to keep it simple due to my hardships.  But before I lost all my equipment  I love love LOVED incorporating live instrumentation and organic sounds that I collect with a high quality portable audio recorder.  As far as programs, I will forever be a Fruity Loops head.  Right now I’m in the rebuilding process, so all I’m using is an SM58 and MXL 990 microphone hooked up to a windows computer through a TASCAM audio interface and an M-AUDIO Axiom-25 USB Midi controller. I also use this old ass YAMAHA PSR-47 if I want to get more keyboard action than the two octave M-Audio device.  These are things that were donated to me by fellow musicians who saw that I was struggling and didn’t want me to stop producing because they believe in my talent. If that’s not real love, I don’t know what is.

INST: What made you want to create beats?

SPM: Beatboxing. In New Jersey, I had to walk and ride public transit everywhere. I would always beatbox, but I would never be able to get these beats in my head to sound the way I imagined them. I had to find a way to get people to hear what I was hearing and the beatbox wasn’t cutting it. Someone gave me a cracked copy of fruity loops and the rest is history.

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INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

SPM: I said this before, I love live instruments. But I don’t have money for such things. The only reason I really got into sampling is because I didn’t have a way to record instruments the way I wanted them to sound. But because I was forced to do that, I gained a deep love and understanding with the art of sampling. Since the two mean so much to me, I would love to be able to mix the two seamlessly in the future.

INST: Who influenced your style?

SPM: WHY DO YOU MAKE ME CHOOSE!? It’s so hard for me to pick a list of people without rambling. But let’s just say the obvious, Dr. Dre, Timbaland, DangerMouse, Kanye West, Mr DJ of Outkast, Mannie Fresh Scott Storch to name a few. And the least obvious, Stevie Wonder, Freddie Mercury, Tenacious D, George Clinton, Quincy Jones, Cee Lo Green- have I confused you yet?

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INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

SPM: No. Why would you even say such a thing?

INST: Is there a difference between being a producer and being a beat maker?

SPM: Yes. I don’t even know why we started calling ourselves producers, because the literal definition of a music producer doesn’t always imply that they compose or arrange anything. Sometimes a producer just gets everyone together and tells them how to play his vision. A beat maker is sitting in a dark room with a computer and an MPC or some other device reshaping and twisting sounds from all over to create a newer and fresher sound. A producer is a manager, a beat maker is a one man band.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

SPM: If you’re really interested in being in the industry, I suggest you do two things that I have yet to do and have hindered my success and skill level. 1. Take an audio course mixing, mastering, production, Protools, sounds all that. The reason my music sounds so rough, is because I didn’t do this. YET. 2. take MUSIC courses. Pick up an instrument. Don’t just learn it, MASTER it. And don’t just learn the instrument, learn music theory in general. Dabble with other instruments even if you aren’t comfortable playing them. Learn all the instruments you can, but master one. Don’t be a slave to the synthesizer, find a way to incorporate real sounds into your music, real instruments and real drums that no one can mimic because they are yours.

INST: Where can we hear your work?

SPM: I’m on soundcloud all the doodah day. So you can definitely check me out there soundcloud.com/spooksmcghie. I also have a mixtape of beats out on Datpiff, thatcrack, hotnewhiphop (pick yourpoision) called “Beats N Shyt” So check that out. In the meantime, here are some sets I made with my favorite beats.

https://soundcloud.com/spooksmcghie/sets/instrumentals-with-samples

https://soundcloud.com/spooksmcghie/sets/instrumentals

WU-Mixed Dropping April 9th. The Saga Continues!

WU-Mixed Dropping April 9th. The Saga Continues!

Beatmaker-Producer VerseAll has set a date to release WU-Mixed for April 9th, 2013. WU-Mixed is a compilation of songs by the 1990’s super group Wu-Tang Clan, remixed with all new production by VerseAll. This 14 track compilation features all of the WTC members plus appearances from The Notorious BIG, Red Man, and Ruff Endz. WU-Mixed will be available for “FREE DOWNLOAD” at VERSEALL.COM and VERSEALL.BANDCAMP.COM (Limited time only at bandcamp).

Here (Hear) is a sneak preview of what you can expect from the WU-Mixed project.

NOTE: VerseAll is in no way affiliated to the Wu-Tang Clan and is only a fan of the group. This compilation is for promotional use only.

20130226-202846.jpgSince I’ve set out on my mission to find beatmakers-producers talented enough to showcase their work, I’ve come across different types of beatmakers. Style , attitude, and personality all play a major role in beat making. Some beatmakers are unsure of their work and not cofident enough to show-off their work because of the lack of artist they’ve worked with, if they’ve worked with any at all. Other beatmakers are cocky for no good reason and some are proffessional, humble, work hard, and are very talented. For instance, Here (Hear) is an example of a talented, humble, hard working, and proffessional beatmaker. SERIOUS Beats is all of the above and most of all, his name speaks for it self (Serious). His production is off the hook and varies from genre and style plus a very clean mix down.  Serious Beats is an ULTIMATE Beatmaker to say the least. Beatmakers, Producers, and Music Lovers, meet Serious Beats

INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?

SB: My name is serious beats i’m from the north side of Chicago

INST: Who have you worked with and how long have been beat making or producing?

SB: I’ve worked with several artist’s and producers local and worldwide right now my team consists of custom made and kylive beats , i’ve been making beats for about 8 to 9 years started really making beats seriously around 2005

INST: What equipment and or software are you using?

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SB: My audio interface is the mbox 3 I use midi controllers (Akai mpk 49, m audio oxygen 49) for my monitors i use Ferrari gray edition krk rokit 8’s and i also do a lot of mixing through my kns krk 8400 headphones the software i use to make beats is fl 10 and pro tools. nexus 2 and sylenth are 2 of my main vsts.

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INST: What made you want to create beats?

SB: This artist i knew around my area had a copy of fl studio 3 so he installed the program on my computer and that was really my starting point i was going to a couple studio’s and i saw the setups and process of creating beats that really pushed me to start investing in my own equipment.

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

SB: I do a lot sampling but if i knew how to play live instruments i would definitely incorporate the 2.

INST: Has anybody influenced your style?

SB: I have a lot of influences i would say my uncle o dig was a major influence for the hip hop i grew up listening to and being around him. Video game music composers like Akira Yamaoka who produced the music for silent hill and Nobuo Uematsu who produced the music for final fantasy also hip hop producers like alchemist, just blaze, the heatmakerz, kanye west, drumma boy, dj premier, justice league, the inkredibles (lee major), the list goes on.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

SB: No. Not anytime soon i’ve decided this is what i want to do for a living. the average person retires 60 to 70 so i have a long way to go lol.

INST: Do you feel that there is a difference in the role of being a producer and being a beat maker?

SB: Definitely, the producer helps with the song writing, song structure and concepts, beat makers do exactly that make the beat.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

SB: Producers, do not spam people,other producers and artist’s just make your music available and think of creative ways to draw traffic, get tags recorded and throw them over your beats and release music don’t hold your beats for ransom you want to be heard. Study mixing, if you want your drums to knock start with volume control lower instruments and samples to give your drums room.

INST: Where can we hear your work?

SB: ProdBySerious.com
SeriousBeatsTV.com
Follow @SeriousBeats

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Legendary Producer/ Lyricist/ Recording Artist Pete Rock checking out drum machines.