Posts Tagged ‘Pete Rock’

Beatmaker-Producer Spooks McGhie

Beatmaker-Producer Spooks McGhie

Spooks McGhie is a beatmaker-Producer from New Jersey. Spooks caught my attention one day while I was listening to random music on facebook and thought to myself that I’d like to interview this beatmaker. I then sent Spooks a message to his inbox about being the first featured beatmaker for my newly launched instrumology.com website. Spooks responded by saying thank you but felt that he wasn’t ready for that title of being the first to be featured so he fell back until he felt that the time was right. We kept in touch via facebook and soundcloud and during this time, I’ve watched Spooks and his production grow and ganer a huge following. His persona is like everybodies favorite party starter and his tracks are very creative. Some tracks are collaborated with his wife making this a perfect combination. Beatmakers-Producers, and Music Lovers, Meet Spooks McGhie!

INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?

SPM: Hey hey young world. I am known as Spooks McGhie Coming at you from the Tri-State area, Brick City New Jersey AKA New York’s illegitimate brother.

INST: Who have you worked with & how long have been beat making or producing?

SPM: Wow. I have been composing for a long time. Always had a knack for sound, didn’t get on any equipment until I was about fifteen, so I guess it’s safe to say 11 years and counting. As far as people I have worked with, I have had some ridiculous setbacks. So I am not at the level I anticipated I would be musically by the time I was 25. But I can rattle off a couple names you may or may not recognize: ChanzizR and BlackScientist of Wi?Not Entertainment, Webbafied, Wino Willy, Badweather, D’Angelo Mack, Wil-EZ, Nzero NZ of Air Haze, Hi-Que, FranksWear, Wheredough?, Collin Moody, Dompollitt Aka Dolla Sign Dott, Gary Adams, Shannon Gillespy, Corr Kendricks, Jamaal Brooks, Droptop Harv, James Gibbs III, Black Astro, Oski of Iron Hogs, Keen Arthur, Anonimuz – you guys don’t know who the hell I’m talking about, do you? That’s okay. You will know ALL of those names soon. I only fox with the best. (HA).

INST: What equipment and or software are you using?

Spooks taking his baby for a stroll!SPM: I use a mixture of hardware and software.  I am forced to keep it simple due to my hardships.  But before I lost all my equipment  I love love LOVED incorporating live instrumentation and organic sounds that I collect with a high quality portable audio recorder.  As far as programs, I will forever be a Fruity Loops head.  Right now I’m in the rebuilding process, so all I’m using is an SM58 and MXL 990 microphone hooked up to a windows computer through a TASCAM audio interface and an M-AUDIO Axiom-25 USB Midi controller. I also use this old ass YAMAHA PSR-47 if I want to get more keyboard action than the two octave M-Audio device.  These are things that were donated to me by fellow musicians who saw that I was struggling and didn’t want me to stop producing because they believe in my talent. If that’s not real love, I don’t know what is.

INST: What made you want to create beats?

SPM: Beatboxing. In New Jersey, I had to walk and ride public transit everywhere. I would always beatbox, but I would never be able to get these beats in my head to sound the way I imagined them. I had to find a way to get people to hear what I was hearing and the beatbox wasn’t cutting it. Someone gave me a cracked copy of fruity loops and the rest is history.

ROCKER[1]

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

SPM: I said this before, I love live instruments. But I don’t have money for such things. The only reason I really got into sampling is because I didn’t have a way to record instruments the way I wanted them to sound. But because I was forced to do that, I gained a deep love and understanding with the art of sampling. Since the two mean so much to me, I would love to be able to mix the two seamlessly in the future.

INST: Who influenced your style?

SPM: WHY DO YOU MAKE ME CHOOSE!? It’s so hard for me to pick a list of people without rambling. But let’s just say the obvious, Dr. Dre, Timbaland, DangerMouse, Kanye West, Mr DJ of Outkast, Mannie Fresh Scott Storch to name a few. And the least obvious, Stevie Wonder, Freddie Mercury, Tenacious D, George Clinton, Quincy Jones, Cee Lo Green- have I confused you yet?

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INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

SPM: No. Why would you even say such a thing?

INST: Is there a difference between being a producer and being a beat maker?

SPM: Yes. I don’t even know why we started calling ourselves producers, because the literal definition of a music producer doesn’t always imply that they compose or arrange anything. Sometimes a producer just gets everyone together and tells them how to play his vision. A beat maker is sitting in a dark room with a computer and an MPC or some other device reshaping and twisting sounds from all over to create a newer and fresher sound. A producer is a manager, a beat maker is a one man band.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

SPM: If you’re really interested in being in the industry, I suggest you do two things that I have yet to do and have hindered my success and skill level. 1. Take an audio course mixing, mastering, production, Protools, sounds all that. The reason my music sounds so rough, is because I didn’t do this. YET. 2. take MUSIC courses. Pick up an instrument. Don’t just learn it, MASTER it. And don’t just learn the instrument, learn music theory in general. Dabble with other instruments even if you aren’t comfortable playing them. Learn all the instruments you can, but master one. Don’t be a slave to the synthesizer, find a way to incorporate real sounds into your music, real instruments and real drums that no one can mimic because they are yours.

INST: Where can we hear your work?

SPM: I’m on soundcloud all the doodah day. So you can definitely check me out there soundcloud.com/spooksmcghie. I also have a mixtape of beats out on Datpiff, thatcrack, hotnewhiphop (pick yourpoision) called “Beats N Shyt” So check that out. In the meantime, here are some sets I made with my favorite beats.

https://soundcloud.com/spooksmcghie/sets/instrumentals-with-samples

https://soundcloud.com/spooksmcghie/sets/instrumentals

WU-Mixed Dropping April 9th. The Saga Continues!

WU-Mixed Dropping April 9th. The Saga Continues!

Beatmaker-Producer VerseAll has set a date to release WU-Mixed for April 9th, 2013. WU-Mixed is a compilation of songs by the 1990’s super group Wu-Tang Clan, remixed with all new production by VerseAll. This 14 track compilation features all of the WTC members plus appearances from The Notorious BIG, Red Man, and Ruff Endz. WU-Mixed will be available for “FREE DOWNLOAD” at VERSEALL.COM and VERSEALL.BANDCAMP.COM (Limited time only at bandcamp).

Here (Hear) is a sneak preview of what you can expect from the WU-Mixed project.

NOTE: VerseAll is in no way affiliated to the Wu-Tang Clan and is only a fan of the group. This compilation is for promotional use only.

20130226-202846.jpgSince I’ve set out on my mission to find beatmakers-producers talented enough to showcase their work, I’ve come across different types of beatmakers. Style , attitude, and personality all play a major role in beat making. Some beatmakers are unsure of their work and not cofident enough to show-off their work because of the lack of artist they’ve worked with, if they’ve worked with any at all. Other beatmakers are cocky for no good reason and some are proffessional, humble, work hard, and are very talented. For instance, Here (Hear) is an example of a talented, humble, hard working, and proffessional beatmaker. SERIOUS Beats is all of the above and most of all, his name speaks for it self (Serious). His production is off the hook and varies from genre and style plus a very clean mix down.  Serious Beats is an ULTIMATE Beatmaker to say the least. Beatmakers, Producers, and Music Lovers, meet Serious Beats

INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?

SB: My name is serious beats i’m from the north side of Chicago

INST: Who have you worked with and how long have been beat making or producing?

SB: I’ve worked with several artist’s and producers local and worldwide right now my team consists of custom made and kylive beats , i’ve been making beats for about 8 to 9 years started really making beats seriously around 2005

INST: What equipment and or software are you using?

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SB: My audio interface is the mbox 3 I use midi controllers (Akai mpk 49, m audio oxygen 49) for my monitors i use Ferrari gray edition krk rokit 8’s and i also do a lot of mixing through my kns krk 8400 headphones the software i use to make beats is fl 10 and pro tools. nexus 2 and sylenth are 2 of my main vsts.

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INST: What made you want to create beats?

SB: This artist i knew around my area had a copy of fl studio 3 so he installed the program on my computer and that was really my starting point i was going to a couple studio’s and i saw the setups and process of creating beats that really pushed me to start investing in my own equipment.

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

SB: I do a lot sampling but if i knew how to play live instruments i would definitely incorporate the 2.

INST: Has anybody influenced your style?

SB: I have a lot of influences i would say my uncle o dig was a major influence for the hip hop i grew up listening to and being around him. Video game music composers like Akira Yamaoka who produced the music for silent hill and Nobuo Uematsu who produced the music for final fantasy also hip hop producers like alchemist, just blaze, the heatmakerz, kanye west, drumma boy, dj premier, justice league, the inkredibles (lee major), the list goes on.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

SB: No. Not anytime soon i’ve decided this is what i want to do for a living. the average person retires 60 to 70 so i have a long way to go lol.

INST: Do you feel that there is a difference in the role of being a producer and being a beat maker?

SB: Definitely, the producer helps with the song writing, song structure and concepts, beat makers do exactly that make the beat.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

SB: Producers, do not spam people,other producers and artist’s just make your music available and think of creative ways to draw traffic, get tags recorded and throw them over your beats and release music don’t hold your beats for ransom you want to be heard. Study mixing, if you want your drums to knock start with volume control lower instruments and samples to give your drums room.

INST: Where can we hear your work?

SB: ProdBySerious.com
SeriousBeatsTV.com
Follow @SeriousBeats

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Legendary Producer/ Lyricist/ Recording Artist Pete Rock checking out drum machines.

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It was the year 2004 when I was first introduced to Fonk-C. We were both at a show in Alexandria Va. to perform that evening along with a host of other artist. I remember the energy coming from Fonk and his crew as they bounced around the stage to a funk based sound track of absolute rhythm.
A year later, I would purchase a cd from then, Culture Cypha group member Enoch 7th Prophet, who had collaborated with Fonk-C for his solo EP entitled “Tone Scientizt”. Fonk’s prouction gives you a bit of an abstract vibe, mixed with a little boom bap, and a blend of southern crunkness to make it all complete. Beatmakers, Producers, and Music Lovers, meet Fonk-C!

INST: Let the world know who you are and where you’re from?

El-Ra: El-Ra Is Fonk-C from Augusta Georgia, living In Hollywood California.

INST: Who are some of the artist you’ve worked with and how long have been producing?

El-Ra: I’ve worked with Eastern Standard, Clutch Brady, B-Ez, K-Dubya, Enoch 7th Prophet, Freedom Black, Jappa, Ed O.G. , JoeNice , Sun-God, Goddess Lyric From Bad Girls Club, F.Durty, SpaceJamShawty, to name a few:
Making Beats / Producing Since 1995 Professionally.

I’ve Recorded at Patchwerk Studio (ATL), Grand Hustle Studio (ATL), Dobbler Studio (ATL), I Zoom Studio (Augusta/Atlanta).

INST: Can you tell us what type of equipment and software you are using?

El-Ra: Hardware— MPC200XL, MOTIF ES7 WORKSTATION, TRITON RACK, AKAI S2000, OLD RECORDS, 1200’s, WAV.FILES, ECT.
Software: ROLAND VS-2400CD Maxed Out, ROLAND VS-8 TRACK, REASON

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INST: How did you first get started creating beats?

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El-Ra: I started making beats because I’m a DJ first. After Dj’ing for a while and learning how to count bars and matching BPM’s, that made me want to become a Producer!

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

El-Ra: I use samples and I also play live.

INST: Who influenced your style?

El-Ra: DJ Premier, Q-Tip, DJ Magic Mike, 2LiveCrew, Rza, Erick Sermon, DJ Quik, Dr.Dre, James Brown, Russ Rock, and Russell Turner.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

El-Ra: I retired last year. You have to balance life and work or else you won’t LOVE your craft!
Although I’m currently making HEAT!!!!

INST: Do you feel that there is a difference when being called a producer or being called a beat maker?

El-Ra: A Producer Creates WHOLE ALBUMS. A Beatmaker Just Makes BEATS.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

El-Ra: Whatever Your Passion Is Follow YOUR HEART!!!!! Stay true to yourself And You Will Progress Long Term!!!! Surround Yourself With PEOPLE That Think Like You And Want The same things in life no matter what COLOR they are!!!!

INST: Where can we hear your work?

El-Ra: Google (El-Ra Is Fonk-C) / SoundClound ( El-Ra Is Fonk-C)

Contact: FonkCrazy@gmail.com

LOVE IS THE BALANCE!!!

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J Dilla making a beat in empty room!

“Do what you love, and love what you do!” -James Yancey aka J Dilla.

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Since the beginning of Hip-Hop, women have gotten very little credit for their roles and contributions to the art form. We often hear stories of how femcee’s have taken the backseat, in order to stroke the male ego. Although a few women in hip-hop have broken through the barriers, there are a lot more women in hip-hop who’s legacies go unnoticed. This is especially true when it comes to production. In a male dominated field of producing, women are starting to emerge and putting their stamp on hip-hop production. I caught up with PHB, cleverly known as ProducHerBeats who is a beatmaker-producer residing in Brooklyn, NY. Her resumé of artist that she has worked with is impressive and her production is full of soul, giving you that good ole boom bap feeling again.
Beatmakers, producers, and music lovers, get to know ProducHerBeats.

INST: Let the world know who you are.

PHB: I am ProducHerBeats.

INST: How long have you been beat making or producing?

PHB: I have been making beats for about 4 years now.

INST: Can you name a few artist that you have worked with in the past or currently?

PHB: I have worked with Lil Fame (MOP), Termanology , STSquad, and R.E.K.S.

INST: What equipment and or software are you using?

PHB: I use LogicPro, Fl Studios, ProTools and turntables, I am a big Fan of the Vinyl world.

INST: How did you first get started making beats?

PHB: I was out of touch with radio and t.v. for a while and when I came back from my little get away, music had changed. The big group was D4L and when I heard their song laffy taffy, I knew I could make better music. So I decided to give it a try and ProducHerBeats was created.

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INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

PHB: I prefer sampling all day. The feeling you can create out of a record that already moves you is a priceless sound if you ask me.

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INST: Who influenced your style?

PHB: Dj Premier , 9th wonder, Dj Statik Selektah, Kanye West, RJD2, and Jake One.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

PHB: Never, It’s what I was born to do! You can never give up on something that’s in your soul, it won’t let you.

INST: Is there a difference between being a producer and being a beat maker?

PHB: Yes, when you’re a beat maker, all you hear is the beat. When you’re a producer, you hear the beat but can also picture an artist on it and new instrumentation to bring out the beat more. A producer can see the bigger picture.

INST: Any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share?

PHB: Don’t ever stop working. There will be a lot of people with advice and opinions and you can take some of it and help make you better, and some of it will be crap. Know how to take the good with the bad and the bad with the good. People will saying things to get you down but it’s the will in the soul that will keep you going. Everyone has a story continue to build yours

INST: Where can we hear your work?

PHB: You can hear my work at: soundcloud.com/ProducHerBeats

PHB: My website will be up and running by end of this month. Which is PHBeats.com where you will be able to listen to new music as well as lease or buy songs of your choice.

PHB: I will have my first album out by June called
“We Never Heard Of You Either”
Ft by Lil Fame (MOP) Termanology,
Dj Statik Selektah, R.E.K.S. Focus Entertainment, and Lil Glen.

Thank You for the love and stay blessed

PHB

Peep PHB’s Production!

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WE, as beatmakers and producers tend to purchase equipment that suits our need for a certain quality of sound and style. Some of us run out and by the latest new peice of equipment no matter how expensive it may be. Then you have the few that hold on to their relic pieces of equipment because they have become accustom to using it. However, many beatmakers and producers lack the care of keeping their equipment safe from accidental spills, dust, smoke, ashes, etc. Most beatmakers, producers, and music engineers smoke and drink inside of their music studios plus allow recording artist to do the same. I’ve always heard that if you smoke around your music equipment or any type of electronic devices such as comupters, cell phones, gaming consoles, etc. it will get damaged earlier than its original life span. Dusty and damp areas are also no good for your equipment so if your setup is in an unkept basement, attic, shed, or a room that doesn’t get much air circulating through it, then chances are your equipment will suffer in the long run.

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Here are some tips that I’ve put together on how to care for your equipment.

Tip 1: Always cover your equipment up after using it.
Doing this will help protect it from from any lingering dust particles that can build up on top or inside of your equipment

Tip 2: Turn off your equipment after you’re done with usage.
Give your machine time to rest. Keeping your equipment on for a long period of time can cause over heating and eventually blowout. Avoid leaving your equipment running all night while you’re sleeping. Not a good move!

Tip 3: Invest in a feather duster and cadenced air.
No matter how well kept your work station might be, you can’t avoid dust. Wipe down your equipment with a dry cloth or feather duster. Use canned air on equipment that has space in between that can hold dust. This helps to keep the dust to a minimum.

Tip 4: NO EATING, DRINKING, OR SMOKING IN THE STUDIO! This goes for every and anybody including yourself that smokes cigarettes etc. We’ve all heard the horror stories of how “so and so” was recording a hit record, got over excited and in his excitement, he knocks over a drink that spilled onto his equipment causing it to short out. My advice to you is to create an area where your clients can eat and be comfortable while you’re working. Smoking should “STRICTLY” be kept outside.

Tip 5: Avoid setting up your equipment in areas that are liable to get water danage.
Rain storms cause flooding to basement areas and leaks to attics due to damaged roof tops so find an area that will be lease damaging to your equipment or invest in some remodeling of your basements and attics and safe proof those areas.

Final Tip: Get insurance for your equipment.
This is one of the best things that you can do for your equipment especially if you are a self made business.

Last bit of advice, Set up some rules for your music studio and stick to them. If you take care of your equipment, your equipment will take care of you

What are your thoughts on this topic? Do you have any tips that you’d like to share? Let’s discuss it in the comments section of my blog.

Peace and BoomTap!

20130212-192953.jpg Producer/Recording Artist Alchemist Making A Beat!

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Lester “EazyBeatz” Angeles is a producer/ beatmaker from Hong Kong who I met online in a producers group on Facebook. After a few conversations with EazyBeats, I gave his beats a listen. I was impressed instantly with his style and production. Since EazyBeatz lives on the other side of the world, I had to email him the questions for this interview.

INST: Let the world know who you are?

EB: Eazy Also Known as EazyBeatz (Asian HipHop Producer) Founder of Hongkong’s Filipino Rap Group “Pinoy Wit Attitude”

INST: Who have you worked with & how long have you been beat making or producing?

EB: To be Honest, I started tryin’ out (making beats) was around 2004/2005.
But when one of my friends showed me (SOUNDCLICK.COM) where you can find downloadable hiphop beats, I was like F*ck it!!!
I’ll just concentrate on writing and start to focus on my “Rap Career”. Then years later, after I found out how important original beats are, because I wanted to do an independent album, I started researching again on how to make a proper hiphop beat. Then I started buying these cheap DRUM PADS, messin’ around with different types of sounds.

Throughout my whole entire years in the Music HipHop Scene, I have worked with Some of the Finest Underground Talents. It’s gon’ Be Pretty Long if I name them out 1 by 1 haha. And; I’m currently not in good terms with some of them haha. Ya’ll Know What’ HipHop is. RITE?!?!?

I’m Currently working with some Top Knotch Artist.

Internationally, I’m working with some underground rappers around New York, Los Angeles, Canada, New Zealand, Florida, Japan, and of course my city “HONGKONG” and Many More….

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INST: What equipment and or software are you using?
EB: Alesis Q49, Studio Projects C1, Akai Mini-MIDI Keyboard, Akai MPD 18 , FL Studio 10 , Abelton 8 LIVE, Alesis MultiMixer 4USB, Korg, NanoPad 2

INST: What made you want to create beats?
EB: Its All about the MONEY (haha), Naaaahh just kidding. I’m a son of a professional musician in Hong Kong, so music has been around me since I was a kid. Growing up I heard different types of music from rock, jazz, pop, and hip-hop. Looking at the music scene rite now, it’s really hard to hook up with some producers around that sell very cheap beats. So I decided to make my hobby into a small business.

INST: Do you use or prefer sampling over playing live instruments?

EB: Well of course I prefer Playing Live Instruments Than Sampling. Hmmm.. it depends though because I use Both of them. depends on what type of music quality you’re bringin’ out.

INST: Who influenced your style?

EB: Swizz Beatz, Dr. Dre, Just Blaze, Jahlil Beatz, The Runners, AraabMuzik, Lex Luger, 808 Mafia, Dj Primiere, Bo1da, Cardiak, The Bizzness, HitBoy, MikeWill, Mannie Fresh, Cool & Dre, Young Chop, !LLM!ND, and Lowkey the Boy Wonder.

INST: Do you ever see yourself quitting or retiring from beat making?

EB: Nope!

INST: Do you feel that there is a difference between being a producer and being a beat maker?

EB: Nope! A BeatMaker Does Sampling and a Producer Plays Live Instruments. But in the END, they still make music. “AINT NO DIFFERENCE”.

INST: Do you have any tips, tricks, or advice that you’d like to share with aspiring Producers and Beatmakers?

EB: All I can say is that when you’re creating music, Put it into your Heart. Trust Your Ears and Forget the Blings. Always be creative about makin New Crazy Sounds. Never Stop learning new stuff. Always watch beatmaking tutorials on youtube and do some research. Always remember that you’re never gonna be called one of the best producers if no one has ever rapped on your BEATS!!!

INST: Where can we hear your work?
EB: Here’s My Own Website: http://lestereazyangeles.wix.com/eazybeatz
Follow Me @ www.soundcloud.com/lester-angeles, www.youtube.com/lesterangele , Add Me on Facebook : Lester Eazybeatz Angeles, http://soundcloud.com/lester-angeles/brand-new-sound-eazybeatz

Checkout Eazy’s Production for your self and leave your feedback.